Depleted Uranium has Destroyed the Genetic Future of Iraq

Markthshark, Daily Kos

May 30, 2008

It’s not just the U.S. military, and it’s not just Iraq. The U.K. has also used depleted uranium in both Iraq and Afghanistan; NATO forces have used it in Kosovo, and Israel allegedly used it in Lebanon and on the Palestinians.

The use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions by the U.S. military may lead to a death toll far higher than that from the nuclear bombs dropped at the end of World War II.

A waste product from the enrichment of uranium, DU, contains nearly one-third the radioactive isotopes of uranium that occurs naturally. DU is generally used in armor-piercing ammunition; despite its classification as a weapon of mass destruction, and subsequent banning by the United Nations.

Incidental inhalation or ingestion of DU particles is very toxic and can remain so forever. To give you an idea of just how toxic: at the end of the first Gulf War, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority estimated that 50 tons remained in Iraq, and that amount could be responsible for 500,000 cancer deaths by the year 2000. Now, it’s not clear whether that prediction came true or not, but to date, an estimated 2,000 tons of DU dust have been generated in the Middle East in general.

In contrast, approximately 250,000 lives were claimed by the explosions and subsequent radiation released by the nuclear weapons dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Natural News.com has the story:

“More than ten times the amount of radiation released during atmospheric testing [of nuclear bombs] has been released from DU weaponry since 1991,” said Leuren Moret, a U.S. nuclear scientist. “The genetic future of the Iraqi people, for the most part, is destroyed. The environment now is completely radioactive.”

Because DU has a half-life of 4.5 billion years, the Middle East will, for all practical purposes, be radioactive forever.

The two U.S. wars in Iraq “have been nuclear wars because they have scattered nuclear material across the land, and people, particularly children, are condemned to die of malignancy and congenital disease essentially for eternity,” said anti-nuclear activist Helen Caldicott. 

Since George H.W. Bush’s first Gulf War, birth defects and childhood cancer rates have increased seven fold in Iraq. And, our troops have paid a heavy price as well. More than 35 percent (251,000) of U.S. Gulf War veterans are dead or on permanent medical disability, compared with only 400 who were killed during the conflict.

It doesn’t have to be like this. We can’t change the past but we can fight to end the use of inhuman weapons in immoral wars of aggression. I believe Barack Obama said it best… (paraphrased)

We not only need to end the war; we need to end the mindset of war.

Those are powerful words and something I’ve never heard before from an American leader… ever.

 

 

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5 Comments

  1. June 15, 2008 at 5:30 pm

    The genetic problems are well known and verified by DOD’s own Colonel J. Edgar Wakayama in his briefing to Pentagon leaders in addition to all of the other research…. the entire briefing is at:

    http://www.traprockpeace.org/du_dtic_wakayama_Aug2002.html

    and critical pages verfying generuc changes- that is what mutagenic by ames tests means.

    Depleted Uranium (DU) Munitions
    COL J. Edgar Wakayama
    OSD/DOT&E/CS
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    The alpha particle taken inside
    the body in large doses is
    hazardous producing:
    n Cell damage and cancer,
    n Clothing and skin protects
    from external alpha exposure.
    Note: Lung cancer is well
    documented.
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    nThe beta particle is hazardous to
    the skin and the lens of the eyes,
    nSafety eyeglasses protect from
    beta particle,
    nLeader gloves protect your hands.
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    n DU is chemically toxic:
    –Due to heavy metal like lead,
    –The target organ is the kidney and
    bone.
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    n Urine samples containing uranium are
    mutagenic as determined by the Ames test.
    n The cultured human stem bone cell line with
    DU also transformed the cells to become
    carcinogenic.
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    Emerging Medical Management Issues:
    n During the Persian Gulf War, a number of
    allied military personnel internalized DU
    fragments as a result of several friendly fire
    incidents (only the allied forces possessed
    DU munitions).
    n The three major routes of human exposure
    to DU are:
    a. Wounding by shrapnel,
    b. Inhalation (lungs and thoracic lymph nodes),
    c. Ingestion (most among children playing and
    eating contaminated soil and contaminated
    drinking water and food in the community).
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    Emerging Medical Management Issues:
    n During the Persian Gulf War, a number of
    allied military personnel internalized DU
    fragments as a result of several friendly fire
    incidents (only the allied forces possessed
    DU munitions).
    n The three major routes of human exposure
    to DU are:
    a. Wounding by shrapnel,
    b. Inhalation (lungs and thoracic lymph nodes),
    c. Ingestion (most among children playing and
    eating contaminated soil and contaminated
    drinking water and food in the community).
    *Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    4. As expected, the highest uranium
    concentrations were in kidneys and bone.
    5. Other tissues also showed significantly
    higher levels.
    6. Urine samples containing uranium
    showed mutagenic as determined by the
    Ames test.
    7. The cultured human stem bone cell line
    with DU also transformed the cells to
    become carcinogenic.
    *
    Depleted Uranium (DU)
    Munitions
    n Emerging environmental concerns include:
    – A significant exposure to DU among
    children playing in the impact sites by
    ingesting heavily-contaminated soil,
    – Slow leaching of DU in local water
    supplies over years,
    – Consuming DU contaminated food
    sources (animals and plants).

  2. June 15, 2008 at 5:49 pm

    It is absolutely essential that all uranium weapons contamination is cleaned iup as requirdd by United States Army Regulation 700-48 with specific actions specified in section 2-4 of AR 700-48.

    AR 700-48 Section 2–4. Handling of RCE
    a. General.
    (1) During peacetime or as soon as operational risk permits, the Corps/JTF/Division Commander’s RSO will
    identify, segregate, isolate, secure, and label all RCE. Procedures to minimize the spread of radioactivity will be
    implemented as soon as possible.
    (2) Radiologically contaminated equipment does not prevent the use of a combat vehicle or equipment for a combat
    mission.
    (3) RSO must consider the operational situation, mission, level of contamination, and types of contaminate when
    evaluating the need to utilize contaminated equipment.
    (4) After the Corps Commander certifies the equipment is decontaminated IAW established OEG or peacetime
    regulations, it may be reutilized.
    (5) The equipment for release for unrestricted use must be decontaminated to comply with peacetime regulations
    versus OEG.
    (6) Explosives Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Units will render equipment safe prior to retrograde operations when
    appropriate.
    b. Use and cannibalization.
    (1) The operation of RCE or cannibalization is prohibited unless the commander has determined that:
    (a) The operational risk is comparable to that found in combat.
    (b) The equipment is required for mission completion.
    (c) Under no condition shall the following items be used or cannibalized if damaged: MC-1 Soil Moisture Density
    Tester (Soil and Asphalt) (NSN 6635-01-030-6896), or commercially procured TROXLER Surface Moisture-Density
    Gauge AN/UDM-2 RADIAC Calibrator Set (NSN 6665-00-179-9037), AN/UDM-6 RADIAC Calibrator Set (NSN
    6665-00-767-7497).
    (2) Under those circumstances in which the commander has waived prohibitive use (see para 2-4b(1)) and deter-mined
    that the operational risk is comparable to combat, equipment may be decontaminated and used for a specified
    mission. Once the circumstances are met, operational necessity is over, that waived contaminated equipment will be
    handled IAW peacetime procedures.
    c. Handling.
    (1) The unit/team/individual responsible for the equipment, whether friendly or foreign, at the time of damage or
    contamination is responsible for taking all action consistent with this regulation and DA PAM 700-48.
    (2) The MACOM commander may designate a radioactive waste/commodity processing facility. The ACERT,
    RADCON and RAMT Teams may be deployed to assist in the processing and management supervision of RCE.
    (3) Maintenance forms, warning tags, and other forms of communication will be used to ensure that personnel
    involved in the reclamation are aware of the contamination status.
    (4) In peacetime, RCE will be transported to the command esignated location for receipt of radioactive material
    where the extent of contamination can be assessed and remediated under controlled conditions.
    (5) In peacetime, the Corps/JTF/Division Commander’s RSO monitor the separation of RCE from uncontaminated
    equipment. The separation must be maintained throughout the entire handling process.
    (6) All equipment, to include captured or combat RCE, will be surveyed, packaged, retrograded, decontaminated and
    released IAW Technical Bulletin 9-1300-278, DA PAM 700-48 and other relevant guidance.
    (7) Equipment will be decontaminated to the maximum extent as far forward in theater as possible, IAW the OEG.
    Under all other conditions, decontamination in-theater will be performed only in accordance with guidance from the
    ACERT/RADCON/Chemical Officer/NBC Staff.
    d. Personal Safety. Personnel handling contaminated equipment need to follow the personal safety measures outlined
    in DA PAM 700-48 and AR 40-5.
    e. Disposal.
    (1) In general, environmental impact must be considered prior to equipment retrograde. Retrograde operations must
    minimize the spread of contamination preventing further harm to personnel and damage to equipment.
    (2) Radioactive material and waste will not be locally disposed of through burial, submersion, incineration, destruction in place, or abandonment without approval from overall MACOM commander. If local disposal is approved, the
    responsible MACOM commander must document the general nature of the disposed material and the exact location of
    the disposal. As soon as possible the MACOM commander must forward all corresponding documentation to the Chief,
    Health Physicist, AMCSF-P, HQAMC.
    (3) Demilitarization in the field is authorized only as a means to ensure that the equipment will not fall into enemy
    hands.
    5 AR 700–48 • 16 September 2002

    **
    the entire regulation AR 70-48 and supporting documents and ignored medical care order to provide medical care to all uranium casualties is at:

    http://www.traprockpeace.org/rokke_du_3_ques.html

  3. Dr. Doug Rokke said,

    June 15, 2008 at 5:57 pm

    The immediate emergency response requirements; that all United States Army personnel must comply with and verify they can peform to standard; for anyone who encounters uraniums weapons use and contamination is specified in:

    Task number: 031-503-1017 “RESPOND TO DEPLETED URANIUM/LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS (DULLRAM) HAZARDS”, STP 21-1-SMCT: Soldiers Manual of Common Tasks, Headquarters Department of the Army, Washington, D.C.

    RESPOND TO DEPLETED URANIUM/LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS (DULLRAM) HAZARDS
    031-503-1017
    NOTE: This task is for wartime situations only. Federal, state, and local laws and regulations have precedence during peacetime.
    Conditions
    Given any combat situation where Depleted Uranium (DU) munitions, or weapon systems that may contain DU or other Low Level Radioactive (LLR) Materials are in use or may be used; cravat/handkerchief, assigned protective mask, first-aid supplies, article similar to duct tape, NBC protective gloves; and one of the following situations:
    1. You encounter serviceable, expended, or damaged DU kinetic energy penetrators or other munitions containing DU.
    2. You encounter operational or damaged US or foreign equipment that had dull-black, heavy dust with any of the following:
    a. Radioactive components.
    b. Spalling looks like melted and re-hardened solder and will be visible around the entry hole created by the DU round as it enters the armor of the vehicle. Residual splattering of spalling could be located inside the vehicle.
    Standards
    Prevent DULLRAM contamination from entering your body.
    TRAINING AND EVALUATION
    Training Information Outline
    NOTE: DULLRAM contamination will not interfere with mission completion.
    NOTE: The only way to confirm DULLRAM contamination is with a radiation detection device.
    1. Identify DULLRAM hazard.
    a. Identify serviceable, expended, or damaged DU kinetic energy penetrators or other munitions that might contain DU.
    b. Identify possible radioactive components in US or foreign equipment.
    c. Identify the following DULLRAM visual impact signatures on damaged US or foreign equipment:
    (1) Spalling looks like melted and re-hardened solder and will be visible around the entry hole created by the DU round as it enters the armor of the vehicle. Residual splattering of spalling could be located inside the vehicle.
    (2) Dull black heavy dust.
    2. Protect respiratory system.
    a. Put on field expedient respiratory protection (cravat, handkerchief, etc.)
    b. Put on protective mask as required if you are working in or around burning vehicle/equipment/material.
    NOTE: Only use protective mask if working in an area where heavy smoke or immediately after DU round has hit your vehicle/equipment/material or the dust plume from the impact has not settled.
    3. Warn others of DULLRAM hazard.
    a. Alert other crew members or individuals within 50 meters of the possible DULLRAM hazard.
    b. If vehicle or munitions are on fire, immediately get out and seek adequate cover.
    CAUTION
    Vehicles that have been hit with munitions may contain unexploded ordnance. This ordnance may not retain its normal shape, and could be unstable. Exercise extreme caution when working near vehicles/equipment/materials, or when removing casualties, since the unstable ordnance may explode.
    c. Don’t react to this as you would an NBC attack.
    NOTE: Individuals within a 50 meter radius of a vehicle are not required to wear respiratory protection unless they are working in an area where (1) heavy smoke, or (2) immediately after DU round has hit the vehicle/equipment/material, (3) or the dust plume from the impact has not settled.
    NOTE: Do not submit NBC 1 Report too higher as you would with an NBC attack. Submit an NBC4 report.
    4. Protect yourself from contact with DULLRAM.
    a. Administer first aid as required.
    (1) Immediately flush open wounds with water.
    (2) Cover with field dressing. Do not attempt to remove any imbedded fragments.
    b. Cover exposed skin if you are within 50 meters of hazard by pulling down sleeves, blouse pants, put on MOPP gloves, and button up coat.
    c. Seal loose contamination on equipment surfaces using duct tape or other available products.
    5. Report the suspected contamination to your supervisor and request further guidance.
    NOTE: Contamination will make food and water unsafe for consumption. Contamination will not interrupt vehicle/equipment use.
    Evaluation Preparation
    Setup: Evaluate this task during a field exercise or during a normal training session. Establish a situation where contamination may occur. Have a piece of equipment or vehicle and simulate a DU round impact or LLR Material damaged by any means possible.
    Brief Soldier: Tell the soldier that the vehicle/equipment has possible contamination in a certain location. Tell the soldier to identify the possible hazard and respond appropriately to the situation.
    REFERENCES
    Required: None
    Related: TB 9-1300-278 and FM 3-4
    HANDS-ON EVALUATION DATE:
    TASK TITLE TASK NUMBER
    Respond To Depleted Uranium/Low Level Radioactive Materials (Dullram) Hazards (SL 1-4) 031-503-1017
    ITEM PERFORMANCE STEP TITLE (CIRCLE ONE)
    1 Identified possible hazards GO / NO GO
    NOTE: Method used depends on scenario selected
    2 Assumed field expedient respiratory protection cravat/handkerchief) immediately or donned protective mask as required GO / NO GO
    3 Warned others of DULLRAM hazard GO / NO GO
    a. Alerted other crew members or individuals within 50 meters of the possible DULLRAM hazard GO / NO GO
    b. Got out of vehicle and seek shelter if vehicle or munitions are on fire GO / NO GO
    4 Protected himself from contact with DULLRAM
    a. Administered first aid
    (1) Flushed open wounds with water.
    (2) Covered open wounds with field dressing.
    Did not attempt to remove any imbedded fragments
    b. Covered exposed skin within 50 meters of hazard (pulled down sleeves, bloused pants, put on MOPP gloves, and buttoned up coat)
    c. Sealed loose contamination on equipment surfaces GO / NO GO

    GO / NO GO
    GO / NO GO
    5 Reported suspected contamination to supervisor GO / NO GO
    Score the soldier GO if all performance measures are passed. Score the soldier NO GO if any performance measure is failed. If the soldier scores NO GO, show the soldier what was done wrong and how to do it correctly. Allow the soldier time to retrain and retest.
    EVALUATOR’S NAME UNIT:

    SOLDIER’S NAME STATUS:
    GO / NO GO

    **
    Needless to say all requirements are ignored, environemtal remediation has not been completed, and medical care has been, is being, and will be denied or delayed and if given ineffective in violation of written orders, regulations, and common sense.

  4. abufazl said,

    June 17, 2008 at 2:19 pm

    The American politicians speak about enviornmental causes while they are the worst threats to the world and its enviornment.

  5. August 8, 2008 at 12:28 am

    […] Uranium has Destroyed the Genetic Future of Iraq article from Hugul Al-Nakhl WordPress […]


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